Leadership

The Transformational Leader

The Transformational Leader

Leadership has been a topic of interest for many years in the organizational sciences. Leaders are present in many aspects of life such as work teams, families, and government to name a few. Some of these leaders, take Dr. Martin Luther King for example, use their positions to positively influence people around them and inspire their followers to create valued change. However, history has shown us that there is also a dark side to leadership; one needs to look no further than Adolf Hitler to see the atrocious acts that a leader can “inspire” his followers to commit. In organizational settings, followers look to leaders for direction and as role models to drive the company towards the ever-important vision that is the basis for the organization’s existence.

Gender Norms

Gender Norms

Women are substantially absent from leadership positions in the workforce: they comprise of only 14.6% of executive officers, 8.1% of top earners, and 4.6% of Fortune 500 CEOs (Warner, 2014). Despite the fact that more women are obtaining college degrees (at all levels) than men (U.S. Dept. of Education, 2012), women still face institutional obstacles in attaining prestigious leadership positions. And the biggest obstacle of all seems to be fighting restrictive gender norms.

Personal Strength

Personal Strength

Have you ever wondered how some people manage to easily accomplish everything on their to-do list, while you find yourself overwhelmed by your own? With all of the everyday stressors that come our way, it’s a wonder to think about how some people manage it all gracefully. “Are they faking it?” you may ask yourself. “Are they tuned into something I’m not?” In fact, there are real differences between how people experience stress

Tone of Voice Matters

Tone of Voice Matters

Is Your Tone of Voice Making Your Employees Feel Unsafe?

Employees feel safe when they feel like their mistakes aren’t held against them, when they can talk about tough issues, take risks, and ask for help without being rejected or undermined. Employees feel safe when their unique skills and talents are valued. According to research by Professor Amy Edmundson at Harvard Business School, when employees feel safe they perform better than when they feel unsafe, in part because they learn better (1999)...